The final submission of your case study / project report will be due at the end of the semester.

Tip

Some updated information about submission dates:

July 25th

Students who submit by this date (at 9am) will receive a 10% bonus.

July 31st

Students who submit by this date (at 9am) will receive a 5% bonus.

August 5th

Students who submit by this date (at 6pm) will not receive an early bonus.

I will expect your final report to be submitted at on August 5th. Please upload a single PDF through Gradescope. Any reports received after the 5th will be considered late; marks will be deducted accordingly. No submissions will be accepted after 9am on Wednesday the 11th.

Evaluation

I will be looking for the following characteristics when I evaluate your final report.

Background

The report should describe all background information that the target audience would need in order to understand the report’s subject.

Target audience

Undergraduate students taking ECE 7420 who understand the fundamentals of computer security but who are not familiar with the specifics of your report’s subject

Summarization

Summarizes key background concepts concisely

Grounding

References appropriate literature as evidence rather than relying on bare assertions of truth and validity

Objectivity

Describes background material objectively and without personal opinion, e.g., "Alice et al. showed P" rather than "I think P"

Description

The report should describe the attack/event/technique in sufficient detail for the target audience to understand what happens/happened without necessarily being about to reproduce it.

Completeness

The attack/event/technique is described from "end to end" (the big picture), though not necessarily from "top to bottom" (with detail beyond what’s required to understand the significance of the subject)

Context

The report explains when the subject was created or occurred in a way that enhances the reader’s understanding of relevant actors' motivations (e.g., why the system was designed the way it was)

Detail

The description contains sufficient detail to understand the subject but not so much extraneous detail as to overwhelm or distract from the main point

Grounding

References appropriate literature as evidence rather than relying on bare assertions of truth and validity

Objectivity

Describes background material objectively and without personal opinion, e.g., "Alice et al. showed P" rather than "I think P"

Methdology (9807 only)

Graduate students describing their project should provide a clear and explicit description of the methdology they followed.

Conclusions

The report should draw conclusions about the subject. What is the significance of the attack/event/technique? What are the ongoing implications, if any?

Claims

The report makes claims about the significance of its subject

Measure

Claims are measured and not exaggerated (e.g., "the most significant attack ever to affect a computer")

Grounding

All claims are grounded in evidence and reasoning

Non-originality

All evidence that supports the conclusions is introduced before the Conclusions section (e.g., the Conclusions do not cite new references)

References

The report should build on the references that were included in the proposal. Some proposals contained sufficient references; others require more or higher-quality references than their original proposals cite.

Quality

The report includes at least one (or, depending on the subject, more) high-quality reference from academic peer-reviewed literature

Diversity

The report includes references from multiple sources and/or perspectives

Durability

Malleable sources (e.g., user-editable content or personal websites) are not used as primary sources

Formatting

Structure

The report is well-structured in sections and subsections (as appropriate), including (at minimum) a title page, abstract, table of contents, introduction, conclusion and list of references

Identity

The report’s author, context (e.g., course) and purpose are clear

References

References are formatted according to a clear and recognizable style (ACM, IEEE, etc.)

Legibility

The report uses appropriate fonts and styles (e.g., headers) to help the reader follow its structure